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When I realized how unprepared I really am

This is a discussion on When I realized how unprepared I really am within the Gun Tactics forums, part of the Gun Forum category; Some issues and misconceptions in your post! Originally Posted by gdsf2 As said above. First, call 911. Lock yourself and your wife in your bedroom. ...


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Old 01-11-2017, 09:17 AM   #46
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Some issues and misconceptions in your post!

Quote:
Originally Posted by gdsf2 View Post
As said above. First, call 911. Lock yourself and your wife in your bedroom.
Although, this may sound like a good strategy, it is one which gives away your most valuable asset, the element of surprise and empowers the burglar to free movement throughout the house. It will be inevitable then that the burglar arrive at the room you are in. Then what? Do you think you will still have the upper hand?

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Let the cops clear the house. They will always be better trained than you or me.
The POLICE are not there to protect you, this is an extreme misconception in many a mind. By the time they arrive, you could be dead expecting any scenario to play out in your preconceived notion.

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Tell the 911 operator you are in the bedroom and have a firearm. He will tell the police so nobody is startled and they can give you directions. I would not send my dog out to deal with the bad guys. I like my dog.
Generally not a good idea to tell anyone you have a firearm, you will put those responding on an even higher alert status and regardless that they know where you are, or you think they know where you are, they still know you have a firearm and can very simply mistake you for the perp. Keeping the dog with you barking is not a good plan either as it instantly gives up your position. I love my dogs, but if it were a choice, my dogs, or my family or me, well, we don't need to talk about the priority order of demise!

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Now, if you live in the middle of nowhere and police are 40 minutes away, you may need to do something different, but living in the burbs this is my plan.
Same rules applies no matter where...

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I have had to do this twice. Both times were false alarms. The cops were great and both times said I did the right thing and thanked me for calling them.
Glad it all worked out for you, but I would re-examine some of your thoughts/plans

Just my $.02, for what it's worth today... Lol
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Old 01-11-2017, 10:58 AM   #47
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Originally Posted by Cooolone View Post



Generally not a good idea to tell anyone you have a firearm, you will put those responding on an even higher alert status and regardless that they know where you are, or you think they know where you are, they still know you have a firearm and can very simply mistake you for the perp. Keeping the dog with you barking is not a good plan either as it instantly gives up your position. I love my dogs, but if it were a choice, my dogs, or my family or me, well, we don't need to talk about the priority order of demise!


Your advice makes me curious what your area of expertise is on this subject, since you're telling the OP that he's wrong. Do you have background as a victim of burglary or robbery, or do you work in a security/ LE profession?

I disagree with some of your advice and statements. I would encourage folks to let dispatch know they are armed, where they are in the home, and what they're wearing, as well as the presence and location of any animals and other people in the home. These are all standard questions asked by any decent dispatcher. I'm not sure why you'd say that telling dispatch you're armed will put responding officers in a higher alert status. I've been one of those officers responding to burglaries for the past 15 years, and I can tell you it doesn't put us in a higher alert status...we actually appreciate the head's up. You told the OP it makes it easier for us to mistake him as the perp, when in fact, it does the exact opposite. Many home and business owners are not armed, and the first person seen on our arrival with a firearm we're likely to believe is the suspect. Having prior info from dispatch that the homeowner is armed and their location and description will greatly reduce the risk of friendly fire. The advice you're giving is quite dangerous, which is why I'm asking where you received your experience and/ or training.

A couple comments you made about giving away position, and not letting the dog bark also need to be addressed. There are two criminal reasons (like I said, more often than not someone in your house is a miscommunication, not criminal) someone is likely to be in your house; a residential burglary or a home invasion robbery. They are very different types of crimes, require different tactics, and the criminal is a totally different animal, depending on the crime.

Burglary is a property crime, it occurs WAY more often, and the suspect is a scared person who wants nothing to do with you, the victim. Their goal is to get stuff fast, avoid detection, and have no contact with you. Alerting them to your presence is usually a great idea...think of the bear analogy, they are more scared of you then you are of them.

Home invasion robbery is a person's crime, and the suspects usually have violent intentions, are often armed, and are not afraid to use weapons. Alerting them to your position might not be a good idea, or it may...it's 50/50. It will question their resolve, but they are likely going to find you either way. The good news is, if you are not a dope dealer, you are extremely unlikely to be the victim of a home invasion. They are exceptionally rare compared to burglaries. When I hear a home invasion come out over the radio my first thought is "dope rip"...I don't recall ever being wrong.

The basis for my opinions, and that's all they are, is 15 years patrol, 4 years on SWAT and 6 as a K9 handler. I've been going to burglaries, sometimes several per day, for many years. I'm not trying to sound like a know it all, but I am confident I know a bit more on the subject than the average Joe. Just my .02 cents.
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Old 01-11-2017, 12:36 PM   #48
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I highly recommend relaying to dispatch that you are armed, what your attire is at the time and where you are in the house. I would add, that you can advise that you will remain hunkered down (if possible) to dispatch as well. Also relaying info about any dogs.

By doing this it allows those responding to kinda set that aside in their minds, and they can focus on any other anomalies.

We are in an inside bedroom of the house, our plan is the wife on phone to 911 while I remain vigilant on the door way. We would both be between the wall and the bed.

We have an upstairs bedroom that we are remodeling and will be upstairs, away from any exposed threat, same scenario wife on phone, me trained on the staircase.

No reason for me to sweep the house.
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Old 01-11-2017, 03:53 PM   #49
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Yeah, TOTALLY agree that when the **** - You need to call 911 and give the operator ALL of your info. Also, keep that operator on the line until LE arrives - and you're secure.

This isn't a bump in the night investigation thing...

Our **** moment was in a house we had lived in for only a month. My wife, 2 kids & I had just returned after living in Asia, so it's a new area for us. it's a 2 story house with a walkout basement, in a rural foothills location west of Denver. Everyone was asleep in our upstairs bedrooms.

~2:30AM there's a HUGE explosion!! - We learn later that someone had throw a water balloon to blowout a large picture window in the masterbath just feet from our bed. I didn't know what had awaken me - It sounded like a bomb!!

We're up stumbling around to grab the wife, my gun & my cell phone - and rushed to the end of the hallway to our kids' bedroom - where we locked the door and called 911.

I remember that call actually had a calming effect - giving the operator our location, where we were in the house, our description - This operator - she was great!!

The LEOs were GREAT too. They cleared our house inside and out, and kept a cruiser outside for several hours. We learned later, that they also submitted our case to a county victims assistance program - that paid for our repairs - WhooYhaa!!

Hope this never happens again - I don't think these get any easier with experience!!

Cheers
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Old 01-12-2017, 06:16 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooolone View Post
Some issues and misconceptions in your post!



Although, this may sound like a good strategy, it is one which gives away your most valuable asset, the element of surprise and empowers the burglar to free movement throughout the house. It will be inevitable then that the burglar arrive at the room you are in. Then what? Do you think you will still have the upper hand?



The POLICE are not there to protect you, this is an extreme misconception in many a mind. By the time they arrive, you could be dead expecting any scenario to play out in your preconceived notion.



Generally not a good idea to tell anyone you have a firearm, you will put those responding on an even higher alert status and regardless that they know where you are, or you think they know where you are, they still know you have a firearm and can very simply mistake you for the perp. Keeping the dog with you barking is not a good plan either as it instantly gives up your position. I love my dogs, but if it were a choice, my dogs, or my family or me, well, we don't need to talk about the priority order of demise!


Same rules applies no matter where...



Glad it all worked out for you, but I would re-examine some of your thoughts/plans

Just my $.02, for what it's worth today... Lol
I know that this was long and winding post and it is easily confused. The comments that you are responding to are not from me the OP. They were the opinion of another forum member. I appreciate all of the feedback on this topic as it has allowed me to see the situation a little clearer and develope a plan with my wife that works for us. Of course that plan could change in a moments notice....all situational.
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Old 01-12-2017, 07:48 PM   #51
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Interesting thread!!

I figure I have about 5 seconds to be alert and ready if someone enters my home since my bedroom is on the main floor and not far from all three entrances. Someone would likely break through the back door because it would be the easiest. The bedroom window would be real disappointing for an intruder because there is a dresser in the way. I have an alarm and a dog with a serious bark but no idea if he would bite and the alarm scares the **** out of him. I wont be making any phone calls because I doubt I would have time.

I have cameras also and my next door neighbor has them surrounding his house and they catch the front and back of my house.

My old home was broken into while i was out of town for over two months and most likely within a few hours of me arriving home. It snowed the night before and the foot tracks were still in the snow when I arrived. The police wouldn't even come out and asked me to come to the station and fill out a report.

I found out who it was and they both have been beaten over it but I will never get the contents back.

Nice way to return home after a family members death


I do not believe I have anything to worry about where I live now but have been looking at some land and building on it and if something happened there it would take a long time for someone to respond unless they just happened to be in the area. State Troopers would most likely arrive before the city or county because even though its in a rural area it is close to the interstate surrounded by farms
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Old 01-12-2017, 08:14 PM   #52
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If we manage to sell our home and move to Texas we'll be in a very different position. We will not have a property that is fully fenced and gated and our bedroom will be on the ground floor. We don't wish to have any pets, so we'll be on our own. I guess we'll develop a plan once we have moved and see what the next house is like.
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Old 01-13-2017, 05:35 AM   #53
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I've had a couple of situations where I thought the house was entered. First incident I was not trained to clear a house, front door standing open at 2:00 AM, told wifey to stay up stairs with the girls while I cleared the house....don't leave the upstairs! I'm in the basement level when I hear breathing behind me.....wifey had to see what was going on and was standing behind me. We discussed following instructions. Lesson # 1. (Front door knob and lock recently changed and didn't latch properly, door blew open...fixed it that day)

Second situation was after I had taken extensive training on clearing a house. New house... Wifey and I were shopping when our alarm company called to advise us our alarm on the lower level walkout doors had been activated, police had been called. As we were returning home called police who said they had checked the house from the outside and there was no sign of entry...thanks guys. Get home, enter house and the door to the lower level, which was ALWAYS closed, was standing open. Different reaction after training..drew my pistol, quickly exited house and called the police. They came and we cleared the house together. Lesson #2....let the guys who get paid to do the job, do the job, they're the experts.

While there were no signs of entry I never figured out how a door (which was always closed) on the second level got opened and there were no signs of entry via the lower level where the alarm was activated.
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Old 01-13-2017, 08:04 AM   #54
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I like that "both been beaten" part


Just bought a P320 full, what is the best light for home defense?
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Old 01-13-2017, 08:24 AM   #55
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Maybe not the best defense their is on the market, but it will sniff out and find that which goes bump in the night.
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Old 01-13-2017, 08:32 AM   #56
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^^^ lol ^^^
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Old 01-13-2017, 08:45 AM   #57
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A few months ago I awoke to the sound of breaking glass in my home. My wife was out of town and I had gone to bed upstairs at 11pm or so. At about 1:30am I heard glass shatter downstairs. I have a quick access safe by my bed containing a full size .40S&W handgun, but instead in my groggy and mildly panicked state, I grabbed my small CCW handgun that was on the dresser by my safe and a flashlight that was also on the dresser. I stayed in the bedroom for about 30 seconds to a minute and listened for any more noises coming from downstairs. Nothing...no sounds at all. So, I headed out of my bedroom with my heart pounding and my gun and flashlight in hand. I didn't turn on any lights, but did a quick check of the upstairs rooms by flashing my light on and then back off in each room. I was concerned about being temporarily blinded by my own light so I tried to keep the light pointed at the floor in the rooms I was checking. I was also concerned about the light making me visible to a possible intruder so I turned the light off as quickly as I could and still manage to navigate my home.

Satisfied that no one was upstairs, I quietly made my way down the stairs and quickly checked each room I came to... I found nothing until I got to the kitchen. There was glass all over the counter and floor (and I'm barefooted)! I did a quick check and saw the door into our garage is unlocked (unusual), but no one was in the house or garage. At this point I turned on the lights and began wondering where all the glass had come from, because no windows were broken and there was no indication that anyone had been in the house.

My answer came when I remembered that my wife had recently rearranged the contents of some of the cabinets over the counter in the kitchen. One of the shelves full of fancy glasses had failed and dropped inside the cabinet. The cabinet doors, being spring loaded, had opened when the glasses fell then very conveniently closed by themselves, leaving no indication of any problem until I opened the cabinet. I was so amped up that I cleaned up the glass from all over the kitchen right then and there. Took about an hour. No way I was going to be able to sleep after my early morning excitement!

Long story short - it was a false alarm, but pointed out some issues with my home defense readiness. I am glad it happened since it allowed me to consider some things that I otherwise might not have thought to address. The following were not readily available or understood for my "trial run", but are now: Shoes/slippers, eyeglasses, cell phone, weapon lights, the realization of how long it takes to be ready to react when groggy, and the anxiety that comes when you really believe there is an intruder in your home.

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Old 01-13-2017, 09:56 AM   #58
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One of the shelves full of fancy glasses had failed and dropped inside the cabinet. The cabinet doors, being spring loaded, had opened when the glasses fell then very conveniently closed by themselves, leaving no indication of any problem until I opened the cabinet.
Those things happen. Last week, my wife opened a kitchen cabinet door and it was just enough movement to cause one of her collector plates to fall off the top of the cabinet.
SMASH into smithereens.
That plate, along with about 10 others in the collection, had been up on top of the cabinets ever since we moved into the home, some 12 years ago.
I suppose it could have fallen by itself in the middle of the night. That would have got my attention.
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Old 01-13-2017, 02:20 PM   #59
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I suppose it could have fallen by itself in the middle of the night. That would have got my attention.
Ha! Believe me, breaking glass in the middle of the night will "definitely" get your attention!
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Old 01-14-2017, 05:28 PM   #60
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Timely post! Less than a week ago, I was awakened at 2 AM by my alarm system (man, talk about an Adrenalin rush). I live in a small foot print house and the three entry doors all are quite close to my bedroom on the first floor. The following 15 minutes revealed a number of important things to me.

Firstly, I awoke in a total blur of sleep but charged with full blown fight-or-flight reflexs. The alarm was screaming and I was struck at how badly the adrenaline made me shake. I remember being a little pee-o'd at that.

The first thing I did was locate my Sig P229 with rail light which lives next to the bed and then quickly put on pants. As the alarm blared (the control panel is in another room) I realized that I couldn't tell which door or window had triggered the alarm though I was pretty sure it wasn't one of the house entry points. So I'm already at a disadvantage of having to get to the alarm panel to a) find out the alarm source, and b) turn the damn thing off!

Then I hear my cell phone ringing in the living room -- perfect! Now I have to enter another room to get to my cell which of course makes me vulnerable but I do so with my pistol at the ready. I get the cell phone and position myself in a defensive place and posture. It's the alarm company calling and asking if I need assistance. I should add at this point that when the alarm sounded, the security lights outside at the back of the house (and visible from my bedroom) activated so I was completely convinced that there was an intruder -- probably in the detached shop out back or in the attached garage.

So I answer "yes, please send the police" as it seems entirely appropriate to let them do their thing at this point. She states that she'll stay on the line until they arrive. I can tell at this point (from alarm co. text message) that the alarm was from the back garage door so I make my way to the kitchen and silence the alarm siren and wait.

The police arrived in about 3 minutes and I could see them arrive without lights/sirens and with two cars. I could see their flashlights approaching the driveway and at that point I went outside on the well-lit porch to greet them. I told them where the alarm came from and showed them there. They found the garage door open and then cleared the garage. They came back out and a neighbor's cat bolted from the garage like a bat out of hell right between their legs! Turns-out that I must have not secured the garage back door and the alarm was triggered by the neighbor's cat pushing its way into the garage through the unsecured door.

I felt like an idiot, told them so, and profusely apologized for having wasted their time and having an unsecured door. The police were awesome and expressed appreciation that I called and let them "do their thing." I was happy to let them! They were accommodating and reassuring. They just chuckled and said that's what they are there for.

Needless to say, I learned a whole lot of things about my plans for such incidents, my limitations, and how to be better prepared. For example, I was unprepared with things like the cell phone being in the other room and my inability to identify which door/window had trigger the alarm.. These contributed to what in retrospect feels like a clumsy response on my part.

It was a humbling experience and a call to training. I'll be reviewing the whole scenario and identifying new strategies and practices. Bottom line is that I never really felt threatened but had someone breached the house, it all would have gone down much more quickly given the small size of my house. Except for the adrenaline-induced shaking (which remained for about a half hour after everything was resolved), I felt like I was generally in control of my actions and decision making. I think I made the right decision to request police response and let them clear the area. Had it been inside the house, I also would have requested police but it likely would have come to a confrontation early-on.

You really never know how many details there are and how many things can go wrong until you go through a scenario.
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