New Year, Learn New Skills. Train, Train, and Train IT WILL SAVE YOUR LIFE. - SIG Talk
SIG Talk Gun Forum

New Year, Learn New Skills. Train, Train, and Train IT WILL SAVE YOUR LIFE.

This is a discussion on New Year, Learn New Skills. Train, Train, and Train IT WILL SAVE YOUR LIFE. within the Gun Tactics forums, part of the Gun Forum category; Hey everyone. Happy New Year! This year make it a point to learn some new skills. Those of you who carry a firearm for work, ...


Go Back   SIG Talk > Gun Forum > Gun Tactics


Gun Tactics Gun Tactics Forum - Share and learn about firearm related tactics and techniques

Like Tree10Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-02-2014, 08:17 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
sig22313's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Georgia
Posts: 410
New Year, Learn New Skills. Train, Train, and Train IT WILL SAVE YOUR LIFE.

Hey everyone. Happy New Year! This year make it a point to learn some new skills. Those of you who carry a firearm for work, have one in your home for defense, or if you carry as a citizen make it a point to be proficient in all areas. Many of you have learned and know all these. For those of you who haven't learned these things or didn't know they needed to be learned here are some ideas.

Learn tactical reloads.

Two hand and one handed shooting, both strong side and weak side.

Moving from open to cover.

Know how to shoot prone, kneeling, standing, from a car, house etc.

Learn the difference between cover and concealment.

Learn and master malfunction drills. (stove pipe, squib round, double feed, FTF, FTE).

Know how to operate your firearm one handed (shooting, loading, clearing malfunctions).

Learn some basic life saving medical techniques. (Ambulances are slow).

Learn a reality based fighting system. I.e. CKM, Haganah F.I.G.H.T. system, ICS, Systema, Combat Hapkido. (Just as with shooting mastering these arts takes time. The time will pass regardless. Start now. There may be a time when your firearm breaks, malfunctions, or runs out of ammo. Etc).

Learn how to shoot and move in light, low light, and dark.

Learn instinctive shooting.

Weapon retention.

Weapon presentation.

Know how to operate a light and laser properly. (Backlighting, telegraphing, announcing presence prematurely, and blinding your partner are some of the no no's).

These are just some suggestions. Train hard. Speaking from experience you can never train enough and when you think you know enough you will get burned.

Last edited by sig22313; 01-02-2014 at 11:42 PM.
sig22313 is offline  
Register

Welcome to the SIG Talk Forum dedicated to SIG Sauer Pistols and SIG Sauer Rifles.

We welcome everyone and the community is free to join so register today and become part of the SIG Talk Forum!

Old 01-02-2014, 08:29 PM   #2
Super Moderator
Supporting Member
 
DuchessX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Michigan
Posts: 4,791
Thanks for posting the list. Happy New Year to you!
sig22313 likes this.
DuchessX is offline  
Old 01-02-2014, 10:10 PM   #3
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Peoples Republik of Kalifornia
Posts: 3,089
Great advice. I have been an outspoken advocate of professional training on this and other forums ad nauseum. My responses to your suggestions in bold below:

Quote:
Originally Posted by sig22313 View Post
Hey everyone. Happy New Year! This year make it a point to learn some new skills. Those of you who carry a firearm for work, have one in your home for defense, or if you carry as a citizen make it a point to be proficient in all areas. Many of you have learned and know all these. For those of you who haven't learned these things or didn't know they needed to be learned here are some ideas.

Learn tactical reloads. done

Two hand and one handed shooting, both strong side and weak side. done

Moving from open to cover. done

Know how to shoot prone, kneeling, standing, from a car, house etc. done

Learn the difference between cover and concealment. done

Learn and master malfunction drills. (stove pipe, squib round, double feed, FTF, FTE). done

Know how to operate your firearm one handed (shooting, loading, clearing malfunctions). done... but its not easy!

Learn some basic life saving medical techniques. (Ambulances are slow). done

Learn a reality based fighting system. I.e. CKM, Haganah F.I.G.H.T. system, ICS, Systema, Combat Hapkido. (Just as with shooting mastering these arts takes time. The time will pass regardless. Start now. There may be a time when your firearm breaks, malfunctions, or runs out of ammo. Etc). done

Learn how to shoot and move in light, low light, and dark. done

Learn instinctive shooting. ??? this means different things to different people

Know how to operate a light and laser properly. (Backlighting, telegraphing, announcing presence prematurely, and blinding your partner are some of the no no's). Light yes. IMHO lasers are for mall ninja's unless mounted on full auto sub-guns

These are just some suggestions. Train hard. Speaking from experience you can never train enough and when you think you know enough you will get burned. becoming a warrior is a lifelong journey!
Where I do my small arms tactical training: www.TFTT.com
bearone2 and sig22313 like this.

Last edited by ronin2; 01-02-2014 at 10:15 PM.
ronin2 is offline  
 
Old 01-02-2014, 10:20 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
sig22313's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Georgia
Posts: 410
Instinctive shooting is a skill that takes time. Just like throwing a ball or pointing all the aiming is done on an instinctive level. In high stress, high speed, life and death encounters one will not line up the sights, get a perfect sight picture, perfect stance, and squeeze. Now the more practice the better and faster the skills come but being able to instinctive shoot or point shoot will improve one's chances of surviving.

Professional training and practice ar so important. Owning a firearm does not make one a gunfighter.

I have a laser on several weapon systems just because they came with my light. I have never used on duty. They can promote some very bad habits and they can be a crutch. Just like electronic ballistic calculators, knowing the hard skill is what matters.

As far as reality based systems this cannot be stressed enough. I am an instructor in all the above mentioned and several others (the ones mentioned are the best).

I am glad to have a fellow advocate for training.

Last edited by sig22313; 01-02-2014 at 10:27 PM.
sig22313 is offline  
Old 01-02-2014, 10:26 PM   #5
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Peoples Republik of Kalifornia
Posts: 3,089
Quote:
Originally Posted by sig22313 View Post
Instinctive shooting is a skill that takes time. Just like throwing a ball or pointing all the aiming is done on an instinctive level. In high stress, high speed, life and death encounters one will not line up the sights, get a perfect sight picture, perfect stance, and squeeze. No the more practice the better and faster the skills come but being able to instinctive shoot or point shoot will improve one's chances of surviving.

Professional training and practice ar so important. Owning a firearm does not make one a gunfighter.

I have a laser on several weapon just because they came with my light. I have never used on duty. They can promote some very bad habits and they can be a crutch. Just like electronic ballistic calculators, knowing the hard skill is what matters.

As far as reality based systems this cannot be stressed enough. I am an instructor in all the above mentioned and several others (the ones mentioned are the best).

I am glad to have a fellow advocate for training.
I am curious to get another "qualified individual's" opinion; for the average homeowner who will does not have very much or any training, what is the better home defense weapon: handgun with light, shotgun, carbine?

My recommendation is

The handgun with a light if the citizen intends to "attempt" to clear his house.

If the homeowner takes my advice and does not try to clear the house: dial 911 and STAY ON PHONE, count noses and ralley famliy in master bedroom behind the best available cover, I recomment a shotgun for that barracade duty only.

Your thoughts sir? This as you know is a widely and heated topic of debate on gun forums.

BTW... my last rant on the subject of professional training here in SiGTalk: Professional weapons training...

Last edited by ronin2; 01-02-2014 at 10:29 PM.
ronin2 is offline  
Old 01-02-2014, 10:37 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
sig22313's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Georgia
Posts: 410
Personally I would move my family to the room that we have designated, put them behind cover, and have my wife with a shotgun. Call 911 of course and stay on the line. While they are doing this I am going to clear the house. Having said that I have thousands of hours of training and real world experience.

The average person should stay put. That is the person with no training, poor physical stamina/strength, improper mindset, and no tactical experience. This person should stay put with his or her family and use their doorway 'fatal funnel' to their advantage. Keeping in mind that sheetrock walls are not cover.

On the topic of clearing, the tactics involved are important. Using your knowledge of your own house is a great advantage. I would carry a pistol for clearing. While clearing with a light one should never backlight themselves, announce their presence, nor should they just blow and go with the light on. Presenting a weapon inside a doorway prior to entry is a no no. The use of a handheld mirror can greatly help clear blind corners and stairs.

I could go on and on but the bottom line is don't go beyond your training and skill.
sig22313 is offline  
Old 01-02-2014, 10:53 PM   #7
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Peoples Republik of Kalifornia
Posts: 3,089
Quote:
Originally Posted by sig22313 View Post
Personally I would move my family to the room that we have designated, put them behind cover, and have my wife with a shotgun. Call 911 of course and stay on the line. While they are doing this I am going to clear the house. Having said that I have thousands of hours of training and real world experience.

The average person should stay put. That is the person with no training, poor physical stamina/strength, improper mindset, and no tactical experience. This person should stay put with his or her family and use their doorway 'fatal funnel' to their advantage. Keeping in mind that sheetrock walls are not cover.

On the topic of clearing, the tactics involved are important. Using your knowledge of your own house is a great advantage. I would carry a pistol for clearing. While clearing with a light one should never backlight themselves, announce their presence, nor should they just blow and go with the light on. Presenting a weapon inside a doorway prior to entry is a no no. The use of a handheld mirror can greatly help clear blind corners and stairs.

I could go on and on but the bottom line is don't go beyond your training and skill.
Glad to see we are in complete agreement. IMHO, when clearing a dark house with limited room for maneuver/pie slicing, looking for an opponent of unknown skill level, the CQB weapons retention issues presented with a long gun in unskilled hands outweigh its increased fire power/stopping power.

Last edited by ronin2; 01-02-2014 at 11:01 PM.
ronin2 is offline  
Old 01-02-2014, 11:41 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
sig22313's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Georgia
Posts: 410
Quote:
Originally Posted by ronin2 View Post
Glad to see we are in complete agreement. IMHO, when clearing a dark house with limited room for maneuver/pie slicing, looking for an opponent of unknown skill level, the CQB weapons retention issues presented with a long gun in unskilled hands outweigh its increased fire power/stopping power.
Agreed. 100%
sig22313 is offline  
Old 01-03-2014, 01:29 AM   #9
Super Moderator
Supporting Member
 
Malicious Compliance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Location: Location:
Posts: 15,782
Happy new year!

Quote:
Originally Posted by sig22313 View Post
This year make it a point to learn some new skills. Those of you who carry a firearm for work, have one in your home for defense, or if you carry as a citizen make it a point to be proficient in all areas.

These are just some suggestions. Train hard. Speaking from experience you can never train enough and when you think you know enough you will get burned.
Thank you, excellent post!
Malicious Compliance is online now  
Old 01-03-2014, 06:10 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Planet Earth
Posts: 2,345
Yes but,

Quote:
Originally Posted by sig22313 View Post
Personally I would move my family to the room that we have designated, put them behind cover, and have my wife with a shotgun. Call 911 of course and stay on the line. While they are doing this I am going to clear the house. Having said that I have thousands of hours of training and real world experience.

The average person should stay put. That is the person with no training, poor physical stamina/strength, improper mindset, and no tactical experience. This person should stay put with his or her family and use their doorway 'fatal funnel' to their advantage. Keeping in mind that sheetrock walls are not cover.

On the topic of clearing, the tactics involved are important. Using your knowledge of your own house is a great advantage. I would carry a pistol for clearing. While clearing with a light one should never backlight themselves, announce their presence, nor should they just blow and go with the light on. Presenting a weapon inside a doorway prior to entry is a no no. The use of a handheld mirror can greatly help clear blind corners and stairs.

I could go on and on but the bottom line is don't go beyond your training and skill.

I take your points and concede your expertise. I've been involved in other activities where the same kind of warning/instruction offered. The "problem" as I see it is, how does one know how to not go beyond the skill set? It is kinda difficult to know what one doesn't know until thrown in ones face or flushed out in the latest class. For instance.....whatcha mean you just don't point gun, pull trigger??? Huh??????

I'd encourage the experienced ones to post possible pitfalls of self/home defense.

Thanks,

Larry
dragonfly13 likes this.
larry8061 is offline  
Old 01-03-2014, 06:23 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
sig22313's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Georgia
Posts: 410
Quote:
Originally Posted by larry8061 View Post
I take your points and concede your expertise. I've been involved in other activities where the same kind of warning/instruction offered. The "problem" as I see it is, how does one know how to not go beyond the skill set? It is kinda difficult to know what one doesn't know until thrown in ones face or flushed out in the latest class. For instance.....whatcha mean you just don't point gun, pull trigger??? Huh??????

I'd encourage the experienced ones to post possible pitfalls of self/home defense.

Thanks,

Larry
I guess it comes down to knowing your limitations. Honesty with oneself is always good. I do believe that many people have potential and are often limited by lack of experience, training, and proper instruction. The mind should never be taken for granted.
sig22313 is offline  
Old 01-03-2014, 06:53 PM   #12
Supporting Member
Supporting Member
 
03shkr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 291
Wow. Great info posted here. I get my training at Threat Dynamics. And I see a lot of consistency in this thread - it's good to see this.
03shkr is offline  
Old 01-03-2014, 07:40 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Sirsigalot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Tallahassee Fl
Posts: 1,036
Sirsigalot here......
Thanks.
Sirsigalot is offline  
Old 01-04-2014, 10:47 PM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by ronin2 View Post
I am curious to get another "qualified individual's" opinion; for the average homeowner who will does not have very much or any training, what is the better home defense weapon: handgun with light, shotgun, carbine?

My recommendation is

The handgun with a light if the citizen intends to "attempt" to clear his house.

If the homeowner takes my advice and does not try to clear the house: dial 911 and STAY ON PHONE, count noses and ralley famliy in master bedroom behind the best available cover, I recomment a shotgun for that barracade duty only.

Your thoughts sir? This as you know is a widely and heated topic of debate on gun forums.

BTW... my last rant on the subject of professional training here in SiGTalk: Professional weapons training...
The first (and best) choice is to hunker down in a room with your home defense weapon of choice and call 911. If you have to clear the house, retrieve kids, etc. from elsewhere in the house then the best choice is a Handgun w/ a light/laser.

Clearing a structure by yourself is extremely dangerous and there is no good way to do it, however I recently did some coursework on the "least bad" way to do it. Armed Movement In Structures (AMIS)

Here is a good AAR a friend of mine wrote about the class: http://getinmyguardbro.blogspot.com/...s-ga-1214.html

Last edited by HCL3; 01-04-2014 at 10:52 PM.
HCL3 is offline  
Old 01-05-2014, 07:38 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
sig22313's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Georgia
Posts: 410
Quote:
Originally Posted by HCL3 View Post
The first (and best) choice is to hunker down in a room with your home defense weapon of choice and call 911. If you have to clear the house, retrieve kids, etc. from elsewhere in the house then the best choice is a Handgun w/ a light/laser.

Clearing a structure by yourself is extremely dangerous and there is no good way to do it, however I recently did some coursework on the "least bad" way to do it. Armed Movement In Structures (AMIS)

Here is a good AAR a friend of mine wrote about the class: Project T-Rex: AAR: ShivWorks AMIS in Americus GA 12/14-15/2013
I am going to politely disagree with you to an extent. If one's skill set is lacking stay put however a plan of egress is needed. I will most defiantly say that clearing your own home is far different than clearing a building, someone else's home, on patrol or in a high risk warrant/barricaded suspect situation.

In any maneuver there is risk. I know what is in my house and where things are located. I also do not have any clue about he intentions of whoever may be inside. I will conclude they are there to be very bad. The best was to neutralize a threat is to go toward it and not back yourself in a corner if you have the skill set.

I most certainly agree it is dangerous but we live in a dangerous world. I know my skill set, I know my house, I know what my training and experience has been. I will move toward the threat. A bedroom is not cover in most houses.

This is where training and experience come in.
sig22313 is offline  
Reply

  SIG Talk > Gun Forum > Gun Tactics


Search tags for this page

new skills to learn for the new year

Click on a term to search for related topics.

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar SIG Talk Discussions
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
San Fran Train Passengers Distracted By Phones To Notice Shooter's Gun In Plain sight Malicious Compliance Gun Tactics 7 10-09-2013 10:43 AM
How often and how do you train? rocket91 Gun Tactics 8 09-08-2013 02:32 AM
3 Effective Techniques to Train Your Situational Awareness and Recognize*Change Malicious Compliance Gun Tactics 5 08-16-2013 03:21 AM
Anyone else own body armor and train in it? ronin2 Guns 11 08-12-2013 02:59 PM


Top Gun Sites Top Sites List

Powered by vBulletin 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
Copyright © 2010 - 2017 SIG Talk. All rights reserved.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.SIG Talk is a SIG Sauer Firearms enthusiast's forum, but it is in no way affiliated with, nor does it represent SIG Sauer, Inc. of Exeter, NH.