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Legion Pull weight

This is a discussion on Legion Pull weight within the Legion Series forums, part of the SIG Sauer Pistols category; Is the pull weight (trigger) of the Sig P226 SAO adjustable? If so through what range?...


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Old 01-01-2017, 06:11 PM   #1
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Legion Pull weight

Is the pull weight (trigger) of the Sig P226 SAO adjustable?
If so through what range?
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Old 01-01-2017, 06:23 PM   #2
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i don't have one but welcome from az.
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Old 01-01-2017, 06:38 PM   #3
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Welcome to Sig Talk!! I don't own a Legion either, but don't think they have 'adjustable' trigger pulls. There is a overtravel set screw on the Legion trigger, but trigger pull weights are a function of the main or hammer spring's weight.

Typically, SIG ships their P series pistols with 21 or 22lb mainsprings. A lot of folks, including me are more comfortable with 17 or 18lb springs in our target guns, and 18 or 19lbs in our carry weapons. Wolff gun springs offer lots of options that are very inexpensive.

Action enhancement or 'trigger' jobs can take a few lbs off too...

Cheers
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Old 01-01-2017, 06:42 PM   #4
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Welcome from PA!

Not sure about adjusting trigger. But, I feel it's perfect now!
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Old 01-01-2017, 11:21 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenforest View Post
Is the pull weight (trigger) of the Sig P226 SAO adjustable?
If so through what range?

It's not adjustable
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Old 01-02-2017, 12:05 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kansascity45 View Post


Action enhancement or 'trigger' jobs can take a few lbs off too...

Cheers

First, welcome to SigTalk!

As Kansascity45 says!

Watch the hammer carefully, from the side, as you slowly pull the trigger to dry fire Repeat this several times. Notice the hammer moves back, further compressing the main or hammer spring before the hammer moves forward, released by the sear.

This slight rearward movement is the reason why changing to a weaker hammer spring will reduce trigger pull within reason, don't expect miracles, but SA trigger pull will decrease a pound or two. As will the energy available to the firing pin - for this reason, you don't want to go too low on the hammer spring.

Now, the reason the hammer must move back before it will release is due to SIG's using a quite positive sear angle as this is deemed "safer". Like a pawl in a gear notch, before the sear can come out of that notch, it must cam the hammer backward. This is why a trigger job, done by a competent gunsmith (like Robert Burke) will include reducing the positive sear angle towards more neutral and often cutting a slight relief angle as well, in order to eliminate trigger creep. The surfaces of sear and hammer will be checked to be sure they are true and engaging evenly.

A P-Series SIG can have a trigger pull below 2 pounds - I adjusted a P938 that low, just for the challenge to see if I could. It really was too light, so I adjusted it back up to just over 3. My carry P229's have 3 pound SA pulls, some would say that's too light for carry, and about 4 is more common - I like lighter triggers.

Disclaimer: I would not recommend doing a trigger job as described without proper tools (I use Power Custom Series 1 and 2 jigs, as well as machine tool s to fabricate custom parts). By comparison to the P-Series, 1911's are easier to tune. Having some experience is good too . . . . or just send them to Robert, I've heard he does good work.

Edit to add: When a sear is neutral (the sear engagement surface is at a 90 degree angle to the sear's pivot, it will release from the hammer with no camming action - i.e. the hammer does not need to move back to allow the sear to pivot out of the hammer full cock notch. The only thing contributing to trigger pull will the trigger return spring, sear spring, and friction. 1911 guns used for competition will often use a neutral or almost neutral sear. There are a couple of potential disadvantages to a neutral sear, all else equal it will wear quicker. It is inherently less secure than a positive angle, and so needs to be tested for security (simulated drop tests etc.).
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Last edited by bumper; 01-02-2017 at 12:16 AM.
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Old 01-02-2017, 06:17 AM   #7
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Thanks

Everyone. Thanks for the info.
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Old 01-08-2017, 03:44 PM   #8
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My P226 Legion SAO trigger was 3.50# out of the box.

After installing a 15# Wolff hammer spring, the pull dropped to 2.13#. The gun has been 100% reliable with over 3,000 rounds so far using Winchester primers. I use this gun in IDPA ESP & USPSA Limited divisions.


My P229 Legion was 9.24# DA & 4.70# SA. After installing a 17# spring (Gray Guns), the pull was reduced to 7.33# DA & 4.25# SA. I intend to install the rest of the springs in the Gray Guns kit which should reduce the SA pull some more. I'll also try a 15# hammer spring, but the P229 is a CCW gun so reliability is more critical. I'll load some with CCI primers for final reliability testing.

FYI, trigger pull measurements are averages of 20 pulls on a Lyman gauge.
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Old 01-08-2017, 07:07 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bumper View Post
First, welcome to SigTalk!

As Kansascity45 says!

Watch the hammer carefully, from the side, as you slowly pull the trigger to dry fire Repeat this several times. Notice the hammer moves back, further compressing the main or hammer spring before the hammer moves forward, released by the sear.

This slight rearward movement is the reason why changing to a weaker hammer spring will reduce trigger pull within reason, don't expect miracles, but SA trigger pull will decrease a pound or two. As will the energy available to the firing pin - for this reason, you don't want to go too low on the hammer spring.

Now, the reason the hammer must move back before it will release is due to SIG's using a quite positive sear angle as this is deemed "safer". Like a pawl in a gear notch, before the sear can come out of that notch, it must cam the hammer backward. This is why a trigger job, done by a competent gunsmith (like Robert Burke) will include reducing the positive sear angle towards more neutral and often cutting a slight relief angle as well, in order to eliminate trigger creep. The surfaces of sear and hammer will be checked to be sure they are true and engaging evenly.

A P-Series SIG can have a trigger pull below 2 pounds - I adjusted a P938 that low, just for the challenge to see if I could. It really was too light, so I adjusted it back up to just over 3. My carry P229's have 3 pound SA pulls, some would say that's too light for carry, and about 4 is more common - I like lighter triggers.

Disclaimer: I would not recommend doing a trigger job as described without proper tools (I use Power Custom Series 1 and 2 jigs, as well as machine tool s to fabricate custom parts). By comparison to the P-Series, 1911's are easier to tune. Having some experience is good too . . . . or just send them to Robert, I've heard he does good work.

Edit to add: When a sear is neutral (the sear engagement surface is at a 90 degree angle to the sear's pivot, it will release from the hammer with no camming action - i.e. the hammer does not need to move back to allow the sear to pivot out of the hammer full cock notch. The only thing contributing to trigger pull will the trigger return spring, sear spring, and friction. 1911 guns used for competition will often use a neutral or almost neutral sear. There are a couple of potential disadvantages to a neutral sear, all else equal it will wear quicker. It is inherently less secure than a positive angle, and so needs to be tested for security (simulated drop tests etc.).
Bumper, I set my new 229 Legion to Robert for a proper trigger and his reset setup. I have more than my share of P series and this Legion was totally unacceptable, It is going to be one expensive Legion ,BUT it will be correct.
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