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Frog Lube

This is a discussion on Frog Lube within the SIG Sauer Pistols forums, part of the SIG Sauer Forum category; I just tried this product and I'm impressed. The metal felt slick, but not oily. Does anyone have any long term experience with this product?...


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Old 08-25-2012, 09:20 PM   #1
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Frog Lube

I just tried this product and I'm impressed. The metal felt slick, but not oily.
Does anyone have any long term experience with this product?
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Old 08-25-2012, 11:37 PM   #2
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I've been using it for about a year on all my pistols ranging from all metal to polymer framed. Highest round count on a FL'd pistol is about 3k of 9mm, with no issues or excessive wear. I take pictures of all parts before I ever shoot a newly bought pistol, so I can track the wear and tear of use and catch any issues ahead of time. My ~3k round pistols have very little wear. Granted this is just my opinion with no baseline comparisons from other "oiled" pistols, but I absolutely love the stuff. Especially since it's non-toxic, and doesn't smell like year old sweaty socks that's been used to wipe down public toilets.

I'm still amazed how well I can basically wipe my pistols clean with a dry cloth with no solvents or scrubbing. I used to have a whole tray full of solvents, oils, scrubbers, etc. just to clean my pistols. I hated the smell, mess, and clean up.



//Digz
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Old 08-26-2012, 09:44 AM   #3
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Question for anyone,
So does it matter if we heat up an Aluminum frame (hair dryer or oven) that has a Nitron finish? I want to treat it with Frog lube, but don't want to do it if the heat has a bad effect vs. heating the steel slide.

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Old 08-26-2012, 09:51 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Digerati47 View Post
I've been using it for about a year on all my pistols ranging from all metal to polymer framed. Highest round count on a FL'd pistol is about 3k of 9mm, with no issues or excessive wear. I take pictures of all parts before I ever shoot a newly bought pistol, so I can track the wear and tear of use and catch any issues ahead of time. My ~3k round pistols have very little wear. Granted this is just my opinion with no baseline comparisons from other "oiled" pistols, but I absolutely love the stuff. Especially since it's non-toxic, and doesn't smell like year old sweaty socks that's been used to wipe down public toilets.

I'm still amazed how well I can basically wipe my pistols clean with a dry cloth with no solvents or scrubbing. I used to have a whole tray full of solvents, oils, scrubbers, etc. just to clean my pistols. I hated the smell, mess, and clean up.



//Digz
lack of the smell makes me want to try it, thanks.
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Old 08-26-2012, 07:36 PM   #5
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Frog Lube

I use Frog Lube on all my firearms EXCLUSIVELY. Excellent stuff!! I have been using it for 8 months now and won't use anything else. I use the paste and it's not easy to use, but I use Q Tips and it does a great job!!! I also use the liquid occasionally also. Never leaves a detectable film, but still lubes and protects weapon. Customer for life!!!!!
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Old 08-26-2012, 08:50 PM   #6
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Hocuz,
I've used it twice now on my Nitron 2022 with no adverse effects. It actually makes the finish look better. I've modified their technique by using the hair dryer after applying the product and you can see it melting and getting into all of the nooks and crannies. I can see that every potential point of metal on metal contact is being covered.
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Old 08-27-2012, 06:01 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMC24 View Post
Hocuz,
I've used it twice now on my Nitron 2022 with no adverse effects. It actually makes the finish look better. I've modified their technique by using the hair dryer after applying the product and you can see it melting and getting into all of the nooks and crannies. I can see that every potential point of metal on metal contact is being covered.
I think I'm gonna take the grips off and use the oven myself. I will probably call the company first and get the thumbs up on it. It's in the mail and on the way to me now.
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Old 08-27-2012, 08:57 PM   #8
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Hocuz,
While you have the grip off, put some paste on the trigger spring assembly.
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Old 08-27-2012, 09:32 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMC24 View Post
Hocuz,
While you have the grip off, put some paste on the trigger spring assembly.
I plan on putting it everywhere once the ergonomic grips are off. Hopefully there aren't any fussy springs when it comes to heat. I don't wanna get it to hot, but I do want the pores in the metal wide open for receiving the lube.
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Old 08-28-2012, 05:31 AM   #10
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Now that the Frog Lube hype is wearing off, some concerns are arising. On the Defensive Carry forum, there have been complaints about accelerated frame-rail wear and Frog Lube. On the Indiana Gun Owners forum, there was been reports of increased rates of failure in ARs used in courses after a short time due to the Frog Lube burning off so quickly.

Frog Lube, if anything, has a helluva marketing department. Boards across the net have been spammed by promoters and sellers and, like bass fisherman who will try anything that is touted as the latest and greatest (I'm a bass fisherman), gun owners ate it up. On Frog Lube, I remain skeptical.

Frog Lube doesn't appear to be any different than a number of products already on the market. Thompson Center Natural Lube 1000 is one. (Ox Yoke is another). Except for color, Frog Lube and T/C Natural Lube have exactly the same consistency, smell, feel, and react the same to heat. I have used T/C for years on blackpowder guns and it works well as a general protectant. It smells nice - like Ben Gay or Gold Bond Powder. And it does a pretty good job at making it easy to clean a barrel. But T/C ISN'T a grease. IMO, neither it Frog Lube. Neither call their products greases and I don't think they should be used as such.

Frog Lube has gained a lot of followers by stating it's "all natural" and thus safe. But being all natural isn't what makes it safe. There are plenty of unnatural products that are safe. What makes it safe is the fact that it apparently meets US Department of Agriculture standards necessary to be called "food grade."

The USDA states a food grade lubricant must (among other things): perform the same technical functions as any other lubricant, that is, provide protection against wear, friction, corrosion and oxidation, dissipate heat and transfer power, be compatible with rubber and other sealing materials, as well as provide a sealing effect in some cases. In addition, they must be physiologically inert, tasteless, and odorless. (IMO, Frog Lube fails the last standard.)

The USDA also defines three grades of Food Grade Lubricant:

H1 lubricants are food-grade lubricants used in food-processing environments where there is the possibility of incidental food contact.

H2 lubricants are food-grade lubricants used on equipment and machine parts in locations where there is no possibility of contact.

H3 lubricants are food-grade lubricants, typically edible oils, used to prevent rust on hooks, trolleys and similar equipment.

It appears to me that if Frog Lube really is a "food grade lubricant," it would qualify as an H3 lubricant, since it is a apparently made of all edible oils (plant oils). Pure White Mineral Oil is edible (used as a laxative), but it is refined from petroleum. H3 lubricants are used mainly as protectants.

There are plenty of other Food Grade lubricants out there that aren't "all natural" and which are safe. So, being safe isn't an attribute unique to Frog Lube, or any all-natural product.

I've also read plenty of claims that Frog Lube doesn't burn. Well, if it is made from vegetable oils, it will burn. Lubricants that resist burning best are synthetics, which is why that are used in engines and other high heat environments - not vegatable oil.

I decided to run a simple test of Frog Lube. I already knew that Frog Lube felt, smelled and had the same consistency as T/C Natural Lube. There is almost no difference between the two, except color and price (T/C is much cheaper). Both are touted as being carbon-fouling reducers. Of course, T/C isn't advertised for use in smokeless powder guns, like ARs, Frog Lube is. So I wanted to see if they would perform the same at reducing carbon fouling and make clean up easier. And just for yucks, i tried them against a synthetic grease that I use on my guns whihc I have been very pleased with. The next few posts will detail my "test."

Last edited by Micropterus; 08-28-2012 at 06:02 AM.
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Old 08-28-2012, 05:35 AM   #11
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Hereís my first test of Frog Lube. As Iíve stated, I wanted to see how it stacks up against Thompson Center Natural Lube 1000 and Super Lube Synthetic Grease.

The easiest way to get carbon is to burn something. And since the carbon we are dealing with in firearms comes from burned gun powder, I used shotgun powder as a test medium. And it only takes bunring on metal to get a carbon deposit.

Heres what I did:

My control.
I took a piece of aluminum foil. I cut open a shotgun shell and poured the powder contents out on a section of the foil.



I then lit the powder.



This was the carbon residue left behind after burning.



I wiped the residue to see what would come off and what would be left behind.



And checked to see what was on the paper towel.



Very little carbon residue came off with wiping. Hopefully, Frog Lube, T/C and Super Lube will provide a berrier between the burning powder and the foil to prevent carbon from sticking, and make clean up eaiser. We'll see.
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Old 08-28-2012, 05:41 AM   #12
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I tried Frog Lube next.



I applied a scientific amount – “a little bit on my finger tip.”



Coated the foil.



Poured the powder. Another shotgun shell wasted, but it produces the same amount, amnd same type, of powder for each trial.



Lit the powder.



Here's the residue it producted.



A wipe.



It was actually a bit crispy.



What was surpising to me is that more carbon was created than in the control burn. This can only be because the Frog Lube itself burned, adding to the carbon creaed by the burning powder. Ther was actually a crispy carbon resideny left behind which is evident on the cloth. And there was carbon still stuck to the foil, though a little less than in the control burn.

So Frog Lube prevented more carbon from sticking as in the control burn, but produced more carbon overall than because the lube itself burned. If you look closely at the photo of the residue, you can see melted green Frog Lube, and melted Frog Lube that has been browned from heat.

Last edited by Micropterus; 08-28-2012 at 12:51 PM.
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Old 08-28-2012, 05:44 AM   #13
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I tried Thompson Center Natural Lube 1000 next. Same test.



A little bit on the finger tip.



Coated foil.



Powder.



Light it up.



Residue.



Wipe.



Results were almost identical to Frog Lube. There was a little less crispy material left behind with T/C, but there is no doubt some of the T/C actually burned creating more carbon than in the control burn.

Last edited by Micropterus; 08-28-2012 at 12:53 PM.
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Old 08-28-2012, 05:49 AM   #14
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I tried Super Lube Synthetic Grease next. I buy Super Lube at Ace Hardware. I've used it for a couple of years now on my guns, lawn tractor, boat, and trailer wheel bearings. It is a synthetic grease, and is a USDA approved H1 food grade lubricant. It is inert and safe. I put it in a Tupperware bowl . Itís easier to use that way than in the cartridge tube.

Here's how Super Lube compared to the others.



Same scientific amount.



Coat the foil.



Pour the powder (another shotgun shell).



Light.



Residue.



Wipe.



None of the Super Lube burned. The only carbon remining was that from the burned powder. Not only did the Super Lube not burn, it didn't even melt. I was able to wipe off all of the carbon with none remaining behind on the foil. The foil was clean as new.


Hereís the post-test foil. Left to right: untreated, Frog Lube, T/C, Super Lube.

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Old 08-28-2012, 05:55 AM   #15
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This test is hardly scientific. But in my opinion it does show a few interesting things:

A good synthetic grease like Super Lube doesn't burn or even melt, and it maintains its consistency when exposed to the same heat that Frog Lube and T/C were exposed to, both of which burned and created extra carbon in addition to the carbon created by the burning powder. A good synthetic grease like Super Lube is better than Frog Lube and T/C at creating a barrier between the metal surface and burning carbon.

I read a lot of anecdotal reports that AR shooters "get a lot more carbon" off their bolt carrier groups when using Frog Lube. I suspect the hot gas may be burning some of the Frog Lube creating more carbon.

Here's my conclusion:

1) If you want an all-natural lubricant that smells good, is a good protectant, and does reasonable job at keeping carbon from sticking (but may create more carbon from burning) then Frog Lube is okay for that. But, there is a cheaper alternative - T/C Natural Lube - which does the same job just as well.

2) If you want a lubricant that is food-grade safe, is clear, and totally odorless, that stays stable under high heat circumstances and creates a near perfect barrier between the metal and burned carbon, there are better alternatives to Frog Lube. Super Lube is one of them, though there are several makers of high quality synthetic food grade greases that should performed this role.

All this is just my opinion.

Last edited by Micropterus; 08-28-2012 at 06:09 AM.
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